STORY LESSON

The Love Keeps Coming in the Letters

Marcus Aurelius Higgs

The English Confidence Coach, English All Together

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.

Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim. Donec pede justo, fringilla vel, aliquet nec, vulputate eget, arcu. In enim justo, rhoncus ut, imperdiet a, venenatis vitae, justo. Nullam dictum felis eu pede mollis pretium. Integer tincidunt. Cras dapibus. Vivamus elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae, eleifend ac, enim. Aliquam lorem ante, dapibus in, viverra quis, feugiat a, tellus. Phasellus viverra nulla ut metus varius laoreet. Quisque rutrum. Aenean imperdiet. Etiam ultricies nisi vel augue. Curabitur ullamcorper ultricies nisi.

blank

 

Vocabulary
  • asdfasdf
  • asdf
  • asdfa
  • sdfasd
  • fasdf
  • asd
  • fas
Close Vocabulary

Transcript:

Danny and Anni Perasa Live in Brooklyn, New York.

He’s a horse-betting clerk.

She’s a nurse.

They were married in 1978.

And at StoryCorps, they told the story of their very first date.

She started to talk and I said, “Listen, I’m going to deliver a speech,” I said, “at the end, you’re going to want to go home.”

I said, “You represent a dirty 4-letter word.” I said, “That word is ‘love.'” I says, “If we’re going anywhere, we’re going down the aisle because I’m too tired, too sick, and too sore to do any other damn thing.”

And she turned around and she said, “Oh, of course I’ll marry you.”

And the next morning, I called her as early as I possibly could –

ANNIE: And he always gets up early.

– [Laughing] To make sure she hadn’t changed her mind, and she hadn’t. And every year, on April 22nd, around 3:00, I call her and ask her, if it was today, would she do it again and, so far, the answer’s been the same.

ANNIE: Yeah, 25 times, “Yes.” [Laughs]

DANNY: You see, the thing of it is, I always feel guilty when I say “I love you” to you and I say it so often. I say it to remind you that, as dumpy as I am, it’s coming from me — it’s like hearing a beautiful song from a busted old radio and it’s nice of you to keep the radio around the house.

-If I don’t have a note on the kitchen table, I think there’s something wrong. You write a love letter to me every morning.

-Well, the only thing that could possibly be wrong is I couldn’t find a silly pen.

ANNIE: “To my princess: the weather out today is extremely rainy. I’ll call you at 11:20 in the morning” —

DANNY: It’s a romantic weather report.

ANNIE: “And I love you, I love you, I love you.”

DANNY: When a guy is happily married, no matter what happens at work, no matter what happens in the rest of the day, there’s a shelter when you get home, there’s a knowledge, knowing that you can hug somebody without them throwing you down the stairs and saying “Get your hands off me.” 

Being married is like having a color television set — you never want to go back to black and white. 

Danny and Annie spent twenty-seven years happy years together.

Then, in January of 2006, Danny was diagnosed with a fast-spreading terminal cancer.

A few weeks later, Danny and Annie recorded one last interview together from the living room of their Brooklyn home.

The illness is not hard on me. It’s just, you know, the finality of it. And him? He goes along like a trooper. 

Listen, even downhill, a car doesn’t roll unless it’s pushed and you’re giving me a great push. 

The deal of it is we try to give each other hope — and not hope that I’ll live, hope that you’ll do well after I pass, hope that people will support her, hope that, if she meets somebody and likes him, she marries him. 

-You know, he has everything planned, you know. 

-I’m working on her. She said it was her call — she wants to walk out behind the casket alone.

I guess that’s the way to do it, because, when we were married — You know how your brother takes you down, your father takes you down?

She said, “Well, I don’t know which of my brothers to walk in with. I don’t want to offend anybody.”

I says, “I got a solution.” 

I said, “You walk in with me, you walk out with me.” 

And the other day, I said, “Who’s going to walk down the aisle with you behind the casket?” You know, to support her. 

And she said, “Nobody. I walked in with you alone, [Tearfully] I’m walking out with you alone.”

ANNIE: Mm-hmm.

DANNY: There’s a thing in life, where you have to come to terms with dying. 

Well, I haven’t come to terms with dying yet.

I want to come to terms with being sure that you understand that my love for you, up to this point, was as much as it could be and it’ll be as much as it could be for eternity.

I always said the only thing I have to give you is a poor gift and it’s myself. And I always gave it. And if there’s a way to come back and give it, I’ll do that, too.

Do you have the Valentine’s Day letter there?

– Yeah.

“My dearest wife: This is a very special day. It is a day on which we share our love, which still grows after all these years.

Now, that love is being used by us to sustain us through these hard times. All my love, all my days, and more.

Happy Valentine’s Day.”

[Crying] I could write on and on about her.

She lights up the room in the morning hen she tells me to put both hands on her shoulders so she can support me. 

She lights up my life when she says to me at night, “Wouldn’t you like a little ice cream?” or “Would you please  drink more water?” I mean, those aren’t very romantic things to say, but they stir my heart.

In my mind, in my heart, there has never been, there is not now, and never will be, another Annie.

A week after this conversation was recorded, StoryCorps broadcast it on public radio.

Danny died the same day.

Annie received thousands of condolence letters from the radio listeners.

She reads one each day in place of her love letter from Danny.

Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim. Donec pede justo, fringilla vel, aliquet nec, vulputate eget, arcu. In enim justo, rhoncus ut, imperdiet a, venenatis vitae, justo. Nullam dictum felis eu pede mollis pretium. Integer tincidunt. Cras dapibus. Vivamus elementum semper nisi. Aenean vulputate eleifend tellus. Aenean leo ligula, porttitor eu, consequat vitae, eleifend ac, enim.

“I’m a custom quote Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Duis leo fringilla mauris sit amet nibh”

Aenean imperdiet. Etiam ultricies nisi vel augue. Curabitur ullamcorper ultricies nisi. Nam eget dui. Etiam rhoncus. Maecenas tempus, tellus eget condimentum rhoncus, sem quam semper libero, sit amet adipiscing sem neque sed ipsum. Nam quam nunc, blandit vel, luctus pulvinar, hendrerit id, lorem. Maecenas nec odio et ante tincidunt tempus. Donec vitae sapien ut libero venenatis faucibus. Nullam quis ante. Etiam sit amet orci eget eros faucibus tincidunt. Duis leo. Sed fringilla mauris sit amet nibh.